Like I had mentioned in a previous post, animals communicate a number of different ways. The main way birds communicate is through different calls and songs. Within these vocalizations, different lengths, complexities and pitches enable bird species to communicate. Both the songs and calls make up birds repertoire.

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“Songbird Monitoring” by National Park Service under CC by 2.0

Songs

Birds typically use songs when they are displaying courtship, mating, and territorial behavior. Songbirds” are found in the order Passeriformes, which make up more then half of all bird species. These birds produce their song from the syrinx, which is a specialized voice box in their throat. Song is usually sang when the bird is stationary, although some species sing while they are flying. Singing is energetically expensive for the individual, but it plays a very important role in attracting and impressing potential mates. The majority of the time male birds are the ones singing.

“Nightingale Song” by YouTube under CC by 2.0

Sonation, which is a sound that does not come from the throat, but from the bill, feet, or wings. Species such as the woodpecker use their beaks to generate sound and communicate.

 

Calls

Calls are used as an alarm and keeping members of the group in contact. Calls tend to be shorter then songs, and more females produce calls. The males also produce a call called the chek call during mating season.They produce this call when they are perched or flying, feeding, and when threatened.

“Red Bird Calling” by YouTube under CC by 2.0

“American Goldfinch” by YouTube under CC by 2.0

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